5 Common Car Insurance Myths and Facts

Maybe you’ve heard that people who drive red cars get pulled over more, so insurers charge them higher rates. Or that if you let someone else drive your car, their policy will cover an accident. 

Well, when it comes to auto insurance, you shouldn’t always believe what you hear. 

Get the facts about common car insurance myths, and reach out to make sure you have the coverage you need.

Myth #1: A ticket automatically increases your rate.

A moving violation doesn’t have to increase your insurance rate unless it’s a frequent occurrence. You may be able to take a driving course to maintain your rate and even pay less for your ticket.

Myth #2: Car color affects your insurance rate.

The truth is that the color of your vehicle most likely doesn’t affect your premiums. However, there are special cases where color can raise the value of your car — like a custom paint job — which could potentially increase your rates. 

Myth #3: Older cars need less coverage.

If you don’t have a loan on your car, you may not have to carry comprehensive and collision coverage, only the liability coverage required by the state. But you may not want to drop or lower your optional coverage if your car still has significant value, as it would be pricey to repair or replace.

Myth #4: Someone borrowing your vehicle is covered by their own insurance.

Laws vary by state, but usually the insurance covers the vehicle. Before you drive someone else’s car, verify that it’s insured. Don’t assume that your own policy will cover an accident. 

Myth #5: You only need the auto liability insurance that’s required by law.

It’s smart to buy more than the minimum, because personal liability for an at-fault auto accident can be expensive. Adding a personal umbrella policy for additional coverage can be a wise decision, especially when you have assets to protect.

Get in touch today with any questions you have about your policy.

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